Weathering the Storms

Face-on

Face-on

With humility, I can say that I’ve never felt so reassured by my feeling ‘at odds’ with Society at large and even smaller communities.  Self-serving opportunism is now epidemic with little evidence of learning from having observed how this has developed and what it has developed into, in recent decades.

It may not bring me friends or riches but I’m pleased to remain my autistic – not stupid – self,  and recognise that my Aspergers gives me the focus on what actually matters in my life.  I’m not wasting any more of it trying to make sense of senseless man-made constructs and skewed judgements when all I need to find contentment is already within me.

The few friends I have are quality friends.  The little I have is meaningful to me.  I’m not chasing any rainbows.  I have a life to live.

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The Price on Your Head

Rational

Rational

I have to live where I live.  The logistics of life dictate that.  It’s a beautiful place, don’t get me wrong but for a long time I’ve felt that it needs its physical beauty to mask the ugliness that festers from deep within its core. People make a place so its character will reflect them and indeed, the facade of architectural beauty here masks any image of its foundation on slavery and dealing that has damaged much in our world but that didn’t matter as it brought wealth to a few.  We all benefit from that.  And so that became the norm, permeating every level of our society as each became desperate for a slice of the pie.  No mean place.

There have been real examples of altruism throughout time but eventually these just set the benchmark for the perception of goodness to become part of the lie too.  It seems to be genuinely believed that if you say you follow a belief system , then that exempts you from actually having to do so, or to bother with any of its doctrines covering personal behaviour.

A sweeping generalisation, I know, but take a look around, it’s everywhere.  It’s even in the places I’d love to escape to, to get away from here, where the force of the bully has become its reputation more deservedly than anywhere else I know of (yet).  James Christie gave the best description of this place and its people in his book ‘Dear Miss Landau’. Continue reading

Living the Fenner Brockway

A Man at Peace

A Man at Peace

Fenner Brockway was a man prepared to meet the personal cost of speaking out to uphold personal principles and 2015 will mark 30 years since his death.  In the UK, today, the appalling treatment of NHS whistleblowers is in the news.  I know from personal experience that this is the tip of the iceberg, hiding the much wider scale of staff abuse within the so-called ‘care industry’.

From my own perspective, voicing concerns comes from a conscious willingness to hold to account those who make promises without ever having any honest intention of meeting them, combined with an innate, autistic naive belief that they really want to hear constructive criticism and make things right.

Management teams are often supported by systems designed to help them maintain the pretence that all is as it should be while the vulnerable they are charged with protecting are left bereft at the realisation that those they trusted will silence their concerns.  It can take a while to make that discovery and for the most vulnerable, it may never happen.

So, if these management teams are so proud of their work, they will have no fear of staff approaching them with concerns about common practices and staff will have no fear of fulfilling their duty in reporting these concerns.  Grievance procedures will be followed with integrity and monitored by an independent observer and local politics will play no part in proceedings. Continue reading